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Pool Dangers

POOL DANGERS AND DROWNING PREVENTION

  • If you live in Las Vegas than most then summertime means pool time! Swimming pools are a great way to cool off during the summer heat and also great way to increase children’s physical activity. However, swimming pools can have a powerful pull on little children, which can result in serious injury and death. Those glistening turquoise-blue ripples may look especially inviting to an active toddler or an overly confident preschooler.
  • Kids can slip away from the watchful eyes of adults in seconds. It happens every day.
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends several ways parents can help keep children safe around home swimming pools and hot tubs in your own backyard, your neighbor's, or on vacation.

 

  • Fact: Most drownings in kids 4 and under happen in home swimming pools.
    • The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) studied drownings among children age 4 and under in Arizona, California, and Florida, where pools are especially common.
    • It found that nearly 70% of the children were not expected to be at or in the pool, yet they were found in the water. In fact, 46% of the children were last seen in the house.

 

  • Fact: Pool fences are the most effective, proven way to prevent drowning of children.
    • Pool fences are for above-ground pools that are portable, as well as those that are permanent, inground pools, and hot tubs.
    • Between 2013 and 2015, most (58%) drownings among children age 4 and under took place in a pool or spa at their own home.
    • Most children drowned when they wander out of the house and fell into a swimming pool that was not fenced off from the house. They slipped out a door, climbed out a window, or even crawled through a doggy door to access the pool.
    • But, a family swimming pool isn't the only one a child can get into unnoticed. More than a quarter (27%) of drownings among children age 4 and under took place at the home of a friend, relative or neighbor.
    • Only some individual states and municipalities have laws requiring pool safety fences; there is no national pool fence law.
    • Whenever your child will be in someone else's home, always check for ways your child could access pools and other potential hazards.

 

  • Pool fencing recommendations:
    • 4 feet, 4 sides. The pool fence should be at least 4 feet high and completely surround the pool, separating it from the house and the rest of the yard.
    • Climb-proof. The fence shouldn't have any footholds, handholds, or objects such as lawn furniture or play equipment the child could use to climb over the fence.
    • Chain-link fences are very easy to climb and are not recommended as pool fences. (If they are used, make sure openings are 1¾ inches or smaller in size).
    • Slat space.To ensure a small child can't squeeze through the fence, make sure vertical slats have no more than 4 inches of space between them. This will also help keep small pets safe, too.
    • Latch height. The fence should have a self-closing and self-latching gate that only opens out, away from the pool area. The latch should be out of a child's reach—at least 54 inches from the ground.
    • Gate locked, toy-free. When the pool is not in use, make sure the gate is locked. Keep toys out of the pool area when it is not in use

 

  • Pool Alarms àA child drowning is rarely heard.
    • Remember drowning is silent, and alarms break that silence.
    • Beyond a fence, additional layers of protection such as pool alarms, door and gate alarms, and pool covers can provide some added safety around a pool.
    • Pool alarms.Children can drown within seconds, with barely a splash. Swimming pool alarms can detect waves on the water's surface and sound off to attract attention when someone has fallen into the pool.
    • Consider alarms on the pool fence gate and house doors. Door and gate alarms can be equipped with touchpads to let adults pass through without setting them off. House doors should be locked if a child could get to the pool through them.
    • Window guards. These can be especially helpful for windows on the house that face the pool.
    • Make sure alarms are in good shape with fresh batteries, and keep in mind none are substitutes for a properly installed pool fence.
Author
Dr. Rom Satchi

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Bright Futures Pediatrics, Las Vegas, NV
Phone (appointments): 702-331-8914 | Phone (general inquiries): 702-944-4028
Address: 6850 N. Durango Dr., 120, Las Vegas, NV 89149
Bright Futures Pediatrics, Las Vegas, NV
Phone (appointments): 702-381-0499 | Phone (general inquiries): 702-944-4028
Address: 8352 W. Warm Springs Rd., 210, Las Vegas, NV 89113
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